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  • Jason Calacanis 15:00:23 on 2019-01-03 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , founders, , ,   

    As an angel investor should I invest in a founder working on two projects (or working half time on one)? 


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    Peter Thiel (in crown), playing multiple Paypal employees at chess — including Sacks (the only winner) and Roelof Botha (to right of Sacks).

    Just got asked this question on Quora.

    If it’s Elon Musk or Jack Dorsey, sure, go ahead and invest in them.

    If it’s anyone else, it’s likely not going to work out well as an investment.

    [ Click to Tweet (can edit before sending): https://ctt.ac/c1U8m ]

    There are some serial founders who specialize in starting and handing off startups to exceptional managers; Sky Dayton (who founded Boingo Wireless, EarthLink and other startups) comes to mind, but these individuals are rare.

    You need to ask yourself as an angel investor the following two questions when looking at a founder with “founder ADD”:

    1. Has this person managed multiple projects before and how did that work out? I’m going to assume they haven’t done this before or you wouldn’t be asking the question.
    2. Does this person really believe in this startup, product, team and market, and if they do, why are they distracting themselves with other projects?! Perhaps they are hedging their bets.

    The second question is the important one here. Perhaps the person started the project, needs to spend time with a sick family member, and they have an exceptional President and management team. In that case, I would evaluate the performance of the team and the likelihood that the President can take over as CEO.

    Bottom line: startups are absurdly hard. Running two at the same time is like winning two chess matches at once. Anyone can play two games of chess at the same time, but very few will win both. This is an imperfect analogy, of course, because startups are not “win/lose,” they are more like “win small/win medium/win big/win gigantic/lose.” Even if the person wins both games, perhaps they will just win modestly —- which will suck for you as an angel investor.

     
  • Jason Calacanis 15:00:23 on 2019-01-03 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , founders, , ,   

    As an angel investor should I invest in a founder working on two projects (or working half time on one)? 


    Warning: preg_match_all(): Compilation failed: invalid range in character class at offset 7 in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/themes/p2/inc/mentions.php on line 77
    Peter Thiel (in crown), playing multiple Paypal employees at chess — including Sacks (the only winner) and Roelof Botha (to right of Sacks).

    Just got asked this question on Quora.

    If it’s Elon Musk or Jack Dorsey, sure, go ahead and invest in them.

    If it’s anyone else, it’s likely not going to work out well as an investment.

    [ Click to Tweet (can edit before sending): https://ctt.ac/c1U8m ]

    There are some serial founders who specialize in starting and handing off startups to exceptional managers; Sky Dayton (who founded Boingo Wireless, EarthLink and other startups) comes to mind, but these individuals are rare.

    You need to ask yourself as an angel investor the following two questions when looking at a founder with “founder ADD”:

    1. Has this person managed multiple projects before and how did that work out? I’m going to assume they haven’t done this before or you wouldn’t be asking the question.
    2. Does this person really believe in this startup, product, team and market, and if they do, why are they distracting themselves with other projects?! Perhaps they are hedging their bets.

    The second question is the important one here. Perhaps the person started the project, needs to spend time with a sick family member, and they have an exceptional President and management team. In that case, I would evaluate the performance of the team and the likelihood that the President can take over as CEO.

    Bottom line: startups are absurdly hard. Running two at the same time is like winning two chess matches at once. Anyone can play two games of chess at the same time, but very few will win both. This is an imperfect analogy, of course, because startups are not “win/lose,” they are more like “win small/win medium/win big/win gigantic/lose.” Even if the person wins both games, perhaps they will just win modestly —- which will suck for you as an angel investor.

    The post As an angel investor should I invest in a founder working on two projects (or working half time on one)? appeared first on Calacanis.com.

     
  • Jason Calacanis 15:00:13 on 2019-01-01 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , founders,   

    How to get an angel investor’s attention? 


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    Don’t say everything

    Got asked this question on Quora. The answer for me, and for most angels, is easy: send a short email with a link to the product or a product video.

    Protip: Do not email your life story or 3,000+ words on why you built your product. This will make you look deranged.

    The goal of your email is to get the investor to a) understand what you’re doing and to b) respond.

    You want to send just the most important thing, which is one of the following things 99% of the time:

    1. your product
    2. your traction
    3. your market
    4. your technology
    5. you

    What you don’t want to do is send an angel EVERYTHING in the first email. Get them on the hook with the best thing (perhaps two things) and try and get them to ask you more questions.

    As an example, Henry from Cafe X sent me a video of the prototype of the Cafe X machine, along with two sentences, while based in Hong Kong. Since then, I’ve invested millions in the company, I’m on the board and they have three locations rocking in San Francisco. Mission accomplished.

    Note: I don’t respond to all my emails, I get around 300–500 per day… but I do open most of them, and I do click on links often.

    PS – I’m going to try and write a blog post every day in 2019 and set them to publish at 7AM… consider this day one of 365.

     
  • Jason Calacanis 15:00:13 on 2019-01-01 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , founders,   

    How do you get an angel investor’s attention? 


    Warning: preg_match_all(): Compilation failed: invalid range in character class at offset 7 in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/themes/p2/inc/mentions.php on line 77
    Don’t say everything

    Got asked this question on Quora. The answer for me, and for most angels, is easy: send a short email with a link to the product or a product video.

    [ Click to Tweet (can edit before sending): https://ctt.ac/3lcnX  ]

    Protip: Do not email your life story or 3,000+ words on why you built your product. This will make you look deranged.

    The goal of your email is to get the investor to a) understand what you’re doing and to b) respond.

    You want to send just the most important thing, which is one of the following things 99% of the time:

    1. your product
    2. your traction
    3. your market
    4. your technology
    5. you

    What you don’t want to do is send an angel EVERYTHING in the first email. Get them on the hook with the best thing (perhaps two things) and try and get them to ask you more questions.

    As an example, Henry from Cafe X sent me a video of the prototype of the Cafe X machine, along with two sentences, while based in Hong Kong. Since then, I’ve invested millions in the company, I’m on the board and they have three locations rocking in San Francisco. Mission accomplished.

    Note: I don’t respond to all my emails, I get around 300–500 per day… but I do open most of them, and I do click on links often.

    PS – I’m going to try and write a blog post every day in 2019 and set them to publish at 7AM… consider this day one of 365.

    The post How do you get an angel investor’s attention? appeared first on Calacanis.com.

     
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