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  • Jason Calacanis 01:35:39 on 2020-12-07 Permalink
    Tags: besties, calacanis, chamath, david friedberg, david sacks, podcast, podcasting,   

    The All In Podcast and Syndicate 


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    A couple of months ago my pal Chamath texted me and said “I want to do a podcast with me and you.”

    We discussed some names and landed on “All In,” as a tribute to our mutual friendship over poker. This was during the pandemic and in an election year, so there was plenty to talk about above and beyond technology, finance, and entrepreneurship, so we had a full docket of issues to work from.

    We invited two other poker buddies to come on the pod, David Sacks and David Friedberg, and got into a quick rhythm given the massive brainpower of the two Davids.

    We’ve now done 14 episodes and the podcast quickly went from the top 50 to 25 and then top three technology podcasts on Apple’s quirky podcast rankings.

    People have responded in a deep and meaningful way to the podcast, tell us that it’s their favorite listen when we drop an episode every couple of weeks. People say they love the friendship and comradery they feel as we laugh it up while discussing and debating the most important issues of our time.

    Fans tell me they wish the rest of the media world was more like the All In podcast, where folks listen and appreciate each other–even when they disagree. In fact, I think we appreciate each other MORE when we disagree, because it feels like we’re learning, evolving or simply getting to some central truths.

    Anyway, I’m not sure if many of you come to the blog any more, but I thought I would post this to give a little background on how this whole thing got started and let you know how to find the podcast.

    This linktree will take you to all the places to listen:
    https://linktr.ee/allinpodcast

    and you can see us on Zoom if you subscribe on youtube

    For fun Chamath suggested we launch an angel syndicate, so we put up a form for accredited investor to sign up at here: https://www.thesyndicate.com/allin

    At the time of me posting this, 3,000 of you signed up to invest with us–which is nuts! It took me six years to build my angel syndicate to 5,500 members (!!!). Note: if you signup for the All In syndicate you’ll also seem my deal flow, but not the other way around. So if you’re a member of my syndicate at thesyndicate.com you need to signup again for the All In syndicate.

    The post The All In Podcast and Syndicate appeared first on Jason Calacanis.

     
  • Jason Calacanis 15:00:23 on 2019-01-03 Permalink
    Tags: , , , david sacks, , , ,   

    As an angel investor should I invest in a founder working on two projects (or working half time on one)? 


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    Peter Thiel (in crown), playing multiple Paypal employees at chess — including Sacks (the only winner) and Roelof Botha (to right of Sacks).

    Just got asked this question on Quora.

    If it’s Elon Musk or Jack Dorsey, sure, go ahead and invest in them.

    If it’s anyone else, it’s likely not going to work out well as an investment.

    [ Click to Tweet (can edit before sending): https://ctt.ac/c1U8m ]

    There are some serial founders who specialize in starting and handing off startups to exceptional managers; Sky Dayton (who founded Boingo Wireless, EarthLink and other startups) comes to mind, but these individuals are rare.

    You need to ask yourself as an angel investor the following two questions when looking at a founder with “founder ADD”:

    1. Has this person managed multiple projects before and how did that work out? I’m going to assume they haven’t done this before or you wouldn’t be asking the question.
    2. Does this person really believe in this startup, product, team and market, and if they do, why are they distracting themselves with other projects?! Perhaps they are hedging their bets.

    The second question is the important one here. Perhaps the person started the project, needs to spend time with a sick family member, and they have an exceptional President and management team. In that case, I would evaluate the performance of the team and the likelihood that the President can take over as CEO.

    Bottom line: startups are absurdly hard. Running two at the same time is like winning two chess matches at once. Anyone can play two games of chess at the same time, but very few will win both. This is an imperfect analogy, of course, because startups are not “win/lose,” they are more like “win small/win medium/win big/win gigantic/lose.” Even if the person wins both games, perhaps they will just win modestly —- which will suck for you as an angel investor.

     
  • Jason Calacanis 15:00:23 on 2019-01-03 Permalink
    Tags: , , , david sacks, , , ,   

    As an angel investor should I invest in a founder working on two projects (or working half time on one)? 


    Warning: preg_match_all(): Compilation failed: invalid range in character class at offset 7 in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/themes/p2/inc/mentions.php on line 77
    Peter Thiel (in crown), playing multiple Paypal employees at chess — including Sacks (the only winner) and Roelof Botha (to right of Sacks).

    Just got asked this question on Quora.

    If it’s Elon Musk or Jack Dorsey, sure, go ahead and invest in them.

    If it’s anyone else, it’s likely not going to work out well as an investment.

    [ Click to Tweet (can edit before sending): https://ctt.ac/c1U8m ]

    There are some serial founders who specialize in starting and handing off startups to exceptional managers; Sky Dayton (who founded Boingo Wireless, EarthLink and other startups) comes to mind, but these individuals are rare.

    You need to ask yourself as an angel investor the following two questions when looking at a founder with “founder ADD”:

    1. Has this person managed multiple projects before and how did that work out? I’m going to assume they haven’t done this before or you wouldn’t be asking the question.
    2. Does this person really believe in this startup, product, team and market, and if they do, why are they distracting themselves with other projects?! Perhaps they are hedging their bets.

    The second question is the important one here. Perhaps the person started the project, needs to spend time with a sick family member, and they have an exceptional President and management team. In that case, I would evaluate the performance of the team and the likelihood that the President can take over as CEO.

    Bottom line: startups are absurdly hard. Running two at the same time is like winning two chess matches at once. Anyone can play two games of chess at the same time, but very few will win both. This is an imperfect analogy, of course, because startups are not “win/lose,” they are more like “win small/win medium/win big/win gigantic/lose.” Even if the person wins both games, perhaps they will just win modestly —- which will suck for you as an angel investor.

    The post As an angel investor should I invest in a founder working on two projects (or working half time on one)? appeared first on Calacanis.com.

     
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