Updates from Jacqui Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Jacqui 03:44:26 on 2019-01-08 Permalink
    Tags: , , , ,   

    The Ultimate Outsider’s Hack: Read All The Biographies 


    Warning: preg_match_all(): Compilation failed: invalid range in character class at offset 7 in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/themes/p2/inc/mentions.php on line 77
    Something Like An Autobiography: Akira Kurosawa: 9780394714394: Amazon.com: Books

    A waiter at Sugar Bowl this weekend recognized me from my podcast, and after a couple of meals in the dining room, got up the nerve to tell me he was a huge fan. This is, for the record, one of the most wonderful things a podcaster can hear.

    If you see me out, even if I’m with my family, do not hesitate to say “hello,” give me a fist bump, take a selfie (if so inclined), and let me know what your favorite episode is. I like being a micro-celebrity and I love talking to people–don’t be shy!

    Anyway, he asked me for three book recommendations for a young person starting out.

    When I was younger I wanted to be rich and powerful because I grew up poor and powerless. How anyone got rich and powerful was an enigma to me because I didn’t know anyone rich or powerful–until I started reading biographies.

    Biographies are the ultimate outsider’s hack. They enable you to hear all the details of how powerful, important and rich people became those things. Often they will share what they learned, regret and would do differently.

    I recently finished Mike Ovitz’s “Who is Mike Ovitz,” and I was blown away. I’m actually listening to it a second time, and he’s committed to coming on the podcast this year.

    Ten other biographies I recommend:

    1. On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft by Stephen King
    2. Something Like an Autobiography by Akira Kurosawa (top three director for me).
    3. Born Standing Up by Steve Martin
    4. One of a Kind: The Story of Stuey ‘The Kid’ Ungar, the World’s Greatest Poker Player by Nolan Dalla and Peter Alson
    5. All Over but the Shoutin’ by Rick Bragg
    6. Creativity, Inc.: Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration by Ed Catmull & Amy Wallace
    7. The Autobiography of Malcolm X by Malcolm X as told to Alex Haley
    8. Shoe Dog: A Memoir by the Creator of Nike by Phil Knight
    9. Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis by J. D. Vance
    10. Red Notice: A True Story of High Finance, Murder, and One Man’s Fight for Justice by Bill Browder

    Some of these are amazing to listen to on Audible as well — get your free book at audible.com/twist (ohhhh…… auuuudible!).

    Note: I realize I don’t have any female biographies on this list. Does anyone have a top ten for me to read next? I’ve got #Girlboss in my queue but could use some more. The comments are open!

     
  • Jacqui 05:05:07 on 2018-05-25 Permalink
    Tags:   

    Ian Bernstein :  Founder & Head of Product at Misty Robotics 


    Warning: preg_match_all(): Compilation failed: invalid range in character class at offset 7 in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/themes/p2/inc/mentions.php on line 77

    On the latest episode of This Week in StartupsIan Bernstein, former Co-Founder & CTO of Sphero and current Founder & Head of Product at Misty Robotics stops by. Ian introduces his programmable robot, Misty II, and we discuss the current state of generalized robotics, as well as more advanced functionalities that seem to be just around the corner.

    Join us for a glimpse into the future of consumer robotics, AI, the brain-computer interface, and more 🔥.

    This podcast is brought to you by Weebly. A good looking website is great, but a website that turns into a successful online business is better.

    With Weebly, you can manage inventory, collect payments, run promotions and even live-chat with customers. When you’re ready to grow, Weebly can help you get discovered on search engines, create marketing campaigns, and help you with retargeting customers.

    Go to Weebly.com/twist today to learn more & receive a 15% discount on your first purchase.

    This episode is also brought to you by LinkedIn. Get access to LinkedIn’s marketing tools and target your customers with precision.

    Redeem your first free $100 ad credit by visiting linkedin.com/thisweekinstartups.

    Show Notes:

    01:50: Introducing Ian Bernstein, former co-founder and CTO of Sphero and founder and Head of Product at Misty Robotics. Ian talks about founding entertainment robotics company Sphero, the high cost of marketing, more.

    05:48: Ian explains how adding character, personality, and gamification to Sphero’s robots led to a Disney-sanctioned BB-8 robot.

    11:55: Thank you to sponsor, Weebly. Visit weebly.com/twist for 15 percent off your first purchase.

    15:05: Ian talks about the history of generalized robotics and and the inspiration to create Misty Robotics. He also covers lack of consumer readiness as a cause for market failure. He says companies like Amazon are paving the way for more advanced home robotics by building useful AI and familiarizing people with it.

    20:14: Ian demonstrates the Misty robot. Currently targets developers without robotics experience. The robot is programmed via JavaScript. He lists available functions, including 3D mapping, navigation, voice interaction, computer vision, more. Misty is designed to be hackable in terms of software and hardware. The company is letting developers build whatever they choose right now, but will establish a more controlled system later.

    25:53: Thank you to sponsor, LinkedIn. Visit linkedin.com/thisweekinstartups for a $100 a credit.

    29:00: Jason and Ian talk about marijuana use at work and the impact on productivity of getting into a flow or zone.

    31:30: Ian says Misty I, the robot his company handcrafts in Colorado, is now available. Misty II will be available in December (on presale now through May 31). It runs $3.2k but it’s currently half off and TWiST listeners get another $100 off. Ian says one of the reasons Misty chose crowdfunding was to build a community, as, he says, most consumer robotics apps will come from third-party developers.

    34:21: Jason asks when generalized robotics will expand from the hobbyist tinkerer space into useful functionality for average people. Ian says the tech required for general functionality is just now becoming affordable for consumers. Ian notes Misty will support Cortana, Google Assistant, and Alexa. Also has Arduino integrations. Ian and Jason talk about the power of having an assistant-equipped robot following you around. The pair discusses fun and practical applications.

    44:52: Jason asks about Misty Robotics’ strategy in terms of funding, the pace of development, etc. Ian says that while hardware startups are still difficult because the development process is slow and requires several years of runway, investors are becoming more open to it right now. It’s very important to get the right people involved. He says Misty spun out of Sphero in order to focus specifically on home robots.

    48:35: Jason lists a series of jobs, asking Ian which ones are best performed by a robot today. For jobs best performed by humans, he asks how long it will be before robots can take over. They discuss what’s currently (theoretically) possible and the importance of 100-percent functionality versus robots that can perform only some parts of a given process.

    58:21: Jason asks about the state of robotic arm technology and notes the falling cost. Ian speaks about software improvements making lower-cost arms and hands more precise. Sensors and AI play a significant role in improving precision. Jason asks about advanced prosthetics and Ian talks about brain-computer interfaces for prosthetics and for home robots.

    1:02:25: Jason asks Ian what robotics developments in the past year have impressed him the most. Ian says the space is accelerating quickly. Boston Dynamics’ engineering is incredible. The pair discusses applications for Boston Dynamics’ dog-like robot.

    1:04:28: Jason asks about Misty in schools. Ian says that in 15–20 years, robotics will be critical for young people coming out of college, so it’s important that children today have some introduction — the same way he was introduced to computers as a child.

    Reminder to listeners to visit mistyrobotics.com/thisweekinstartups for $100 off the Misty II.

    The post Ian Bernstein :  Founder & Head of Product at Misty Robotics appeared first on Calacanis.com.

     
  • Jacqui 05:05:07 on 2018-05-25 Permalink
    Tags:   

    Ian Bernstein :  Founder & Head of Product at Misty Robotics 


    Warning: preg_match_all(): Compilation failed: invalid range in character class at offset 7 in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/themes/p2/inc/mentions.php on line 77

    On the latest episode of This Week in StartupsIan Bernstein, former Co-Founder & CTO of Sphero and current Founder & Head of Product at Misty Robotics stops by. Ian introduces his programmable robot, Misty II, and we discuss the current state of generalized robotics, as well as more advanced functionalities that seem to be just around the corner.

    Join us for a glimpse into the future of consumer robotics, AI, the brain-computer interface, and more 🔥.

    This podcast is brought to you by Weebly. A good looking website is great, but a website that turns into a successful online business is better.

    With Weebly, you can manage inventory, collect payments, run promotions and even live-chat with customers. When you’re ready to grow, Weebly can help you get discovered on search engines, create marketing campaigns, and help you with retargeting customers.

    Go to Weebly.com/twist today to learn more & receive a 15% discount on your first purchase.

    This episode is also brought to you by LinkedIn. Get access to LinkedIn’s marketing tools and target your customers with precision.

    Redeem your first free $100 ad credit by visiting linkedin.com/thisweekinstartups.

    Show Notes:

    01:50: Introducing Ian Bernstein, former co-founder and CTO of Sphero and founder and Head of Product at Misty Robotics. Ian talks about founding entertainment robotics company Sphero, the high cost of marketing, more.

    05:48: Ian explains how adding character, personality, and gamification to Sphero’s robots led to a Disney-sanctioned BB-8 robot.

    11:55: Thank you to sponsor, Weebly. Visit weebly.com/twist for 15 percent off your first purchase.

    15:05: Ian talks about the history of generalized robotics and and the inspiration to create Misty Robotics. He also covers lack of consumer readiness as a cause for market failure. He says companies like Amazon are paving the way for more advanced home robotics by building useful AI and familiarizing people with it.

    20:14: Ian demonstrates the Misty robot. Currently targets developers without robotics experience. The robot is programmed via JavaScript. He lists available functions, including 3D mapping, navigation, voice interaction, computer vision, more. Misty is designed to be hackable in terms of software and hardware. The company is letting developers build whatever they choose right now, but will establish a more controlled system later.

    25:53: Thank you to sponsor, LinkedIn. Visit linkedin.com/thisweekinstartups for a $100 a credit.

    29:00: Jason and Ian talk about marijuana use at work and the impact on productivity of getting into a flow or zone.

    31:30: Ian says Misty I, the robot his company handcrafts in Colorado, is now available. Misty II will be available in December (on presale now through May 31). It runs $3.2k but it’s currently half off and TWiST listeners get another $100 off. Ian says one of the reasons Misty chose crowdfunding was to build a community, as, he says, most consumer robotics apps will come from third-party developers.

    34:21: Jason asks when generalized robotics will expand from the hobbyist tinkerer space into useful functionality for average people. Ian says the tech required for general functionality is just now becoming affordable for consumers. Ian notes Misty will support Cortana, Google Assistant, and Alexa. Also has Arduino integrations. Ian and Jason talk about the power of having an assistant-equipped robot following you around. The pair discusses fun and practical applications.

    44:52: Jason asks about Misty Robotics’ strategy in terms of funding, the pace of development, etc. Ian says that while hardware startups are still difficult because the development process is slow and requires several years of runway, investors are becoming more open to it right now. It’s very important to get the right people involved. He says Misty spun out of Sphero in order to focus specifically on home robots.

    48:35: Jason lists a series of jobs, asking Ian which ones are best performed by a robot today. For jobs best performed by humans, he asks how long it will be before robots can take over. They discuss what’s currently (theoretically) possible and the importance of 100-percent functionality versus robots that can perform only some parts of a given process.

    58:21: Jason asks about the state of robotic arm technology and notes the falling cost. Ian speaks about software improvements making lower-cost arms and hands more precise. Sensors and AI play a significant role in improving precision. Jason asks about advanced prosthetics and Ian talks about brain-computer interfaces for prosthetics and for home robots.

    1:02:25: Jason asks Ian what robotics developments in the past year have impressed him the most. Ian says the space is accelerating quickly. Boston Dynamics’ engineering is incredible. The pair discusses applications for Boston Dynamics’ dog-like robot.

    1:04:28: Jason asks about Misty in schools. Ian says that in 15–20 years, robotics will be critical for young people coming out of college, so it’s important that children today have some introduction — the same way he was introduced to computers as a child.

    Reminder to listeners to visit mistyrobotics.com/thisweekinstartups for $100 off the Misty II.

     
  • Jacqui 13:31:44 on 2018-05-17 Permalink
    Tags:   

    Ryan Rzepecki – Founder & CEO of JUMP Bikes 


    Warning: preg_match_all(): Compilation failed: invalid range in character class at offset 7 in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/themes/p2/inc/mentions.php on line 77

    On episode 820 of This Week in Startups, I sit down with Ryan Rzepecki, Founder & CEO of JUMP, the dockless, electric bike-share startup that Uber acquired last month for 9-figures. We discuss the many ways in which multimodal transit solutions can transform cities, the future of commuting versus denser cities, the regulatory changes needed to build the cities of the future, and much more.

    Join us for a lively discussion about the challenges of transitioning from a car-oriented society to a multimodal society, and for a glimpse at the future of urban life.

    This podcast is brought to you by Wordpress. Your business needs an online home, it needs a WordPress.com website. 28% of all websites on the web currently run on WordPress.

    We use Wordpress at LAUNCH to host our This Week In Startups website, and Jason’s blog, Calacanis.com.

    Go to WordPress.com/twist for 15% off your brand new website.

    This episode is also brought to you by Walker Corporate Law. A boutique law firm specializing in the representation of startups & founders.

    Walker Corporate Law Group encourages fixed fees, whether you’re starting a company, going through M&A, licensing agreements, terms of service, etc, you will always know the cost upfront.

    Visit WalkerCorporateLaw.com or talk to Scott Walker, the founder, directly at scott@walkercorporatelaw.com or (415) 979-9998.

    Show Notes:

    00:47 – Jason, an Uber investor, introduces Ryan, founder and CEO of the Uber-owned dockless electric bike-share company, JUMP. Ryan talks about the conception and founding of his company.

    03:15 – Ryan explains the electric assist feature of JUMP’s bikes and the regulatory benefits of limiting the fleet to Class 1 electric assist (no throttle, the motor only engages while the user is pedaling).

    06:36 – Ryan explains the locking mechanism, which enables dockless sharing. He also talks about where users can leave the bikes, which leads to a conversation about cities making more space for electric bike and scooter parking/charging.

    11:52 – Thank you to WordPress, which powers the TWiST site and Jason’s personal blog. Go to wordpress.com/twist to get 15 percent off any new plan.

    14:51 – Ryan talks about the falling cost of electric bikes and battery packs. He covers the average income for each bike and the costs of operations and maintenance. He explains JUMP’s plug-free charging system. Currently, JUMP has to pick bikes up from drop-off locations and bring them back to a charging station. JUMP is currently expanding incentives for users to bring bikes to a station for charging. He and Jason also discuss the possibility of a standardized charging system, usable by bikes from multiple companies.

    19:57 – Jason asks about bike thefts. Ryan says JUMP operates in multiple cities around the world and theft is immaterial to the business. There is no aftermarket for heavily branded and specialized bikes.

    21:58 – Ryan talks about JUMP’s relationship with cities and says city governments benefit from JUMP’s data.

    22:48 – Ryan talks about the need to scale its fleet, as San Francisco users find no nearby bikes for one-third of app opens. He also talks about people choosing JUMP over short Uber rides.

    24:41 – Thanks to our sponsor, Walker Corporate Law, which focuses on serving founders and startups. Visit walkercorporatelaw.com.

    26:33 – Jason brings up the Uber acquisition and says bike-sharing is exactly what Uber needs. Ryan says that for JUMP, the sale to Uber will enable rapid global expansion. They discuss the leadership skills of current Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi and the legacy of former CEO Travis Kalanick. They also discuss Uber giving its leadership in each city the power to experiment.

    31:10 – Jason asks what a government would need to do for JUMP to reach scale in a given city, and what that would look like. Ryan says JUMP would need to track utilization rates but a city like San Francisco might support up to 10k bikes. That would require the reallocation of public space for parking and charging. The city would benefit as JUMP would pay for infrastructure and provide the city with data. Would also reduce congestion.

    36:43 – Jason says Uber drivers could be paid to return JUMP bikes to charging stations or to areas where they’re needed. Ryan says Uber already has great tech for demand repositioning. He notes Uber’s multimodal partnerships and says the company provides an excellent alternative to car ownership.

    39:49 – Jason asks about JUMP’s city permit fees and talks about how partnerships with transportation startups can be beneficial to cities, providing increased revenue, reduced pollution etc. Ryan says Copenhagen probably has the best bike lanes/bike-only roads.

    41:39 – Ryan talks about his time working at the New York City Department of Transportation and the closure of Times Square to create pedestrian plazas. He and Jason talk about the increasing popularity of bikes in New York and San Francisco.

    45:38 – Ryan talks about JUMP’s footprint (40 cities in six countries) and future expansion plans. He and Jason talk more about the utilization of public spaces, congestion, the inefficiencies of parking, the long-term trend of making streets friendlier to people, more.

    50:06 – Jason and Ryan talk about how autonomous vehicles could change commutes, where people choose to live, etc. Those who can work while traveling to the office might be more likely to live farther away from their offices. Self-driving cars could reduce congestion and enable higher speed limits, possibly enabling sprawl, however, denser cities are likely the better solution.

    56:08 – Jason closes the show by saying JUMP represents entrepreneurship at its rawest and best: years of passionately working on an idea without anyone taking much notice, followed by a great outcome.

    The post Ryan Rzepecki – Founder & CEO of JUMP Bikes appeared first on Calacanis.com.

     
  • Jacqui 13:31:44 on 2018-05-17 Permalink
    Tags:   

    Ryan Rzepecki – Founder & CEO of JUMP Bikes 


    Warning: preg_match_all(): Compilation failed: invalid range in character class at offset 7 in /homepages/23/d339537987/htdocs/ec/wp-content/themes/p2/inc/mentions.php on line 77

    On episode 820 of This Week in Startups, I sit down with Ryan Rzepecki, Founder & CEO of JUMP, the dockless, electric bike-share startup that Uber acquired last month for 9-figures. We discuss the many ways in which multimodal transit solutions can transform cities, the future of commuting versus denser cities, the regulatory changes needed to build the cities of the future, and much more.

    Join us for a lively discussion about the challenges of transitioning from a car-oriented society to a multimodal society, and for a glimpse at the future of urban life.

    This podcast is brought to you by Wordpress. Your business needs an online home, it needs a WordPress.com website. 28% of all websites on the web currently run on WordPress.

    We use Wordpress at LAUNCH to host our This Week In Startups website, and Jason’s blog, Calacanis.com.

    Go to WordPress.com/twist for 15% off your brand new website.

    This episode is also brought to you by Walker Corporate Law. A boutique law firm specializing in the representation of startups & founders.

    Walker Corporate Law Group encourages fixed fees, whether you’re starting a company, going through M&A, licensing agreements, terms of service, etc, you will always know the cost upfront.

    Visit WalkerCorporateLaw.com or talk to Scott Walker, the founder, directly at scott@walkercorporatelaw.com or (415) 979-9998.

    Show Notes:

    00:47 – Jason, an Uber investor, introduces Ryan, founder and CEO of the Uber-owned dockless electric bike-share company, JUMP. Ryan talks about the conception and founding of his company.

    03:15 – Ryan explains the electric assist feature of JUMP’s bikes and the regulatory benefits of limiting the fleet to Class 1 electric assist (no throttle, the motor only engages while the user is pedaling).

    06:36 – Ryan explains the locking mechanism, which enables dockless sharing. He also talks about where users can leave the bikes, which leads to a conversation about cities making more space for electric bike and scooter parking/charging.

    11:52 – Thank you to WordPress, which powers the TWiST site and Jason’s personal blog. Go to wordpress.com/twist to get 15 percent off any new plan.

    14:51 – Ryan talks about the falling cost of electric bikes and battery packs. He covers the average income for each bike and the costs of operations and maintenance. He explains JUMP’s plug-free charging system. Currently, JUMP has to pick bikes up from drop-off locations and bring them back to a charging station. JUMP is currently expanding incentives for users to bring bikes to a station for charging. He and Jason also discuss the possibility of a standardized charging system, usable by bikes from multiple companies.

    19:57 – Jason asks about bike thefts. Ryan says JUMP operates in multiple cities around the world and theft is immaterial to the business. There is no aftermarket for heavily branded and specialized bikes.

    21:58 – Ryan talks about JUMP’s relationship with cities and says city governments benefit from JUMP’s data.

    22:48 – Ryan talks about the need to scale its fleet, as San Francisco users find no nearby bikes for one-third of app opens. He also talks about people choosing JUMP over short Uber rides.

    24:41 – Thanks to our sponsor, Walker Corporate Law, which focuses on serving founders and startups. Visit walkercorporatelaw.com.

    26:33 – Jason brings up the Uber acquisition and says bike-sharing is exactly what Uber needs. Ryan says that for JUMP, the sale to Uber will enable rapid global expansion. They discuss the leadership skills of current Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi and the legacy of former CEO Travis Kalanick. They also discuss Uber giving its leadership in each city the power to experiment.

    31:10 – Jason asks what a government would need to do for JUMP to reach scale in a given city, and what that would look like. Ryan says JUMP would need to track utilization rates but a city like San Francisco might support up to 10k bikes. That would require the reallocation of public space for parking and charging. The city would benefit as JUMP would pay for infrastructure and provide the city with data. Would also reduce congestion.

    36:43 – Jason says Uber drivers could be paid to return JUMP bikes to charging stations or to areas where they’re needed. Ryan says Uber already has great tech for demand repositioning. He notes Uber’s multimodal partnerships and says the company provides an excellent alternative to car ownership.

    39:49 – Jason asks about JUMP’s city permit fees and talks about how partnerships with transportation startups can be beneficial to cities, providing increased revenue, reduced pollution etc. Ryan says Copenhagen probably has the best bike lanes/bike-only roads.

    41:39 – Ryan talks about his time working at the New York City Department of Transportation and the closure of Times Square to create pedestrian plazas. He and Jason talk about the increasing popularity of bikes in New York and San Francisco.

    45:38 – Ryan talks about JUMP’s footprint (40 cities in six countries) and future expansion plans. He and Jason talk more about the utilization of public spaces, congestion, the inefficiencies of parking, the long-term trend of making streets friendlier to people, more.

    50:06 – Jason and Ryan talk about how autonomous vehicles could change commutes, where people choose to live, etc. Those who can work while traveling to the office might be more likely to live farther away from their offices. Self-driving cars could reduce congestion and enable higher speed limits, possibly enabling sprawl, however, denser cities are likely the better solution.

    56:08 – Jason closes the show by saying JUMP represents entrepreneurship at its rawest and best: years of passionately working on an idea without anyone taking much notice, followed by a great outcome.

     
c
compose new post
j
next post/next comment
k
previous post/previous comment
r
reply
e
edit
o
show/hide comments
t
go to top
l
go to login
h
show/hide help
esc
cancel